Family Following World War 2 On A Map Old Photograph Walking in Wales

You are searching about Family Following World War 2 On A Map Old Photograph, today we will share with you article about Family Following World War 2 On A Map Old Photograph was compiled and edited by our team from many sources on the internet. Hope this article on the topic Family Following World War 2 On A Map Old Photograph is useful to you.

Walking in Wales

During the Second World War my mother served in the British Women’s Land Army. She and her sister were assigned to work on farms in the countryside of Wales while the Welsh farmers went off to fight the war. She used to tell me it was dirty, hard work; but then her eyes always sparkled and she smiled and said: “…of course Wales is the most beautiful country in the world.”

One night, while my wife was watching Juno on Netflix, I started searching on Google. I started thinking about my mother’s life and without much thought I googled “walking in Wales”. I was surprised by how many outfitters there are to help you plan and execute a walking trip in Wales. I was just retired, four months shy of sixty-four years after heart surgery. I was looking for some excitement, and the more I read about Wales, the more exciting the thought of hiking through part of the Welsh countryside became to me.

Pembrokeshire Road

Since we were in Scotland for part of the summer, a side trip to Wales looked easy. There are many walking options in Wales. Generally the north is rougher than the south. I started looking south and came to the Pembrokeshire Coastal Path, a Welsh national park. The actual route is 143 miles long and it is said that if you are fit you can do it in 12-14 days. If you are really fit, you can do it in 10-11 days. It runs along the south coast of Wales, turning north on the western edge. Jean asked if the road had access to come and go, and when I discovered that it did, she suggested that about half that length might be better. And so we found an excellent road from St. David’s north to St. Dogmaels. It is 61.2 miles and can easily be done in six days. Walking north we had the added advantage of having the wind at our backs, which turned out to be a very good element in our favour. I chose my equipment and we ordered it for the third week of July.

For the previous two weeks in Scotland, I checked the BBC weather report every night. And every night the weather and the forecast in Wales were the same. Rain, wind, and more rain. It looked like a wet six days were ahead of us. But we were committed, paid our outfitter in advance and there seemed to be nothing we could do except make sure we moved our rain suits from our golf bags to our backpack.

On July 12th we flew from Glasgow to Cardiff and arrived to brilliant sunshine. Our driver was excited because he hadn’t seen the sun in three weeks. We spent Saturday night in St. David’s and toured the historic St. David’s Cathedral before turning in early. On Sunday morning, as instructed, we went to St David’s Town Hall where at 9am a small coastal bus called Strumble Shuttle arrived to take us to a boat house at St Justinians beach, the starting point of our walk. There was a fine mist in the air. Not rain, but just enough mist to blow out the rain suits. After two hours the rain suits were back in the pack and the day turned bright and sunny. That remained our weather pattern for the next six days.

The Pembrokeshire path is well marked with posts displaying an acorn symbol. The acorn posts often contained a second symbol, this one of a man falling off a cliff, which I believe is there to remind us walkers to pay attention. Most of the cliffs you walk along have large drops of up to 400 feet to the ocean. Our outfitters prepared us well. We had a great guidebook written by two guys who are professional walkers and walking writers. They had precise notes to go with their hand-drawn maps that provided rich detail. Their hand-drawn maps were the perfect compliment to the official map of the coast that we also received.

how is it

The walk? Well, it’s a little rough. “Walking, climbing over huge rocks and trekking up and down massive hills” might be a better description. Some of the ascents and descents are quite steep. We walked through farmer’s fields, on paved roads through small villages and along the edge of cliffs. We had the constant company of sheep, wild goats, horses and cows. The only time I was really scared was on the last day when we crossed our last mountains in St. Dogmaels. If you saw the British Open this summer, you might remember the 50 miles per hour they had along the British coast on Saturday. As those winds howled, we walked along a path eighteen inches wide and only a few feet from 400 feet down a slate rock cliff. The peak at the end of this walk was, without a doubt, the best of the trip.

Along the way we met a lot of interesting people. These are not organized walks. You are on your own and going at your own pace. But we constantly passed people walking the other way or passed us heading north. It seemed that every time I stopped to catch my breath after a particularly steep climb, a guy who looked like he was 80 years old would come walking by with, “Morning. Nice day for a walk, isn’t it?” At one stop in the village of Newport we shared some banana bread with a twenty year old woman from Slovenia. She must have had 50 pounds on her back as she camped and cooked along the trail. She told us she averaged 15 miles a day, which we had no trouble believing as we watched her take off straight up a steep hill.

We walked about eight hours a day and spent each night in a B&B arranged by our outfitter, who even showed up every morning to move our luggage from one B&B to the other. Some of the most interesting people we met were people who owned and operated these B&Bs. Several of them were young to middle-aged Englishmen who had left the rat race of London to buy and run a B&B in Wales.

Wise words

The best advice we received before our walk was this:

1. Buy good low walking shoes and start breaking them in a minimum of four weeks before your walk.

2. Walk six miles a day four times a week for at least a month before your walk.

3. Buy a good walking stick.

But the best advice I discovered was on the first page of the guidebook. “Take your time. Stop to enjoy the views. Take photos. Don’t focus on how much further you have to go today.”

We followed that suggestion and enjoyed our walk because of it. I told my friends I was glad I did it and I was glad it was over. But I absolutely loved it and I can now smile back at my mum and nod when she says, “Wales is the most beautiful country in the world.”

Video about Family Following World War 2 On A Map Old Photograph

You can see more content about Family Following World War 2 On A Map Old Photograph on our youtube channel: Click Here

Question about Family Following World War 2 On A Map Old Photograph

If you have any questions about Family Following World War 2 On A Map Old Photograph, please let us know, all your questions or suggestions will help us improve in the following articles!

The article Family Following World War 2 On A Map Old Photograph was compiled by me and my team from many sources. If you find the article Family Following World War 2 On A Map Old Photograph helpful to you, please support the team Like or Share!

Rate Articles Family Following World War 2 On A Map Old Photograph

Rate: 4-5 stars
Ratings: 4113
Views: 27956426

Search keywords Family Following World War 2 On A Map Old Photograph

Family Following World War 2 On A Map Old Photograph
way Family Following World War 2 On A Map Old Photograph
tutorial Family Following World War 2 On A Map Old Photograph
Family Following World War 2 On A Map Old Photograph free
#Walking #Wales

Source: https://ezinearticles.com/?Walking-in-Wales&id=1757913

Related Posts

default-image-feature

How Much Water Should A 2 Year Old Baby Drink Cheer Your Growing Children By These Kid’s Birthday Party Ideas At Home

You are searching about How Much Water Should A 2 Year Old Baby Drink, today we will share with you article about How Much Water Should A…

default-image-feature

Fall Bulletin Board Ideas For 2 And 3 Year Olds No Money? No Worries! 10 Top Tips for Low-Cost Employee Motivation

You are searching about Fall Bulletin Board Ideas For 2 And 3 Year Olds, today we will share with you article about Fall Bulletin Board Ideas For…

default-image-feature

How Much Water Should A 2 Week Old Baby Drink What to Do When Getting a Bladder Infection

You are searching about How Much Water Should A 2 Week Old Baby Drink, today we will share with you article about How Much Water Should A…

default-image-feature

Explaining Death Of A Pet To A 2 Year Old Writing Sales Copy – A Lesson in Third Grade English

You are searching about Explaining Death Of A Pet To A 2 Year Old, today we will share with you article about Explaining Death Of A Pet…

default-image-feature

How Much Water Should A 1 1/2 Year Old Drink Rissoles Recipe – Mouth Watering Indonesian Roll Snacks With Chicken Ragout

You are searching about How Much Water Should A 1 1/2 Year Old Drink, today we will share with you article about How Much Water Should A…

default-image-feature

How Much Water Should 2 Year Old Drink Per Day 5 Weight Loss Drinks That Can Help You Lose Weight

You are searching about How Much Water Should 2 Year Old Drink Per Day, today we will share with you article about How Much Water Should 2…