Low White Blood Count For A 2 Year Old Toddler The Health Benefits of a Simple Egg Sandwich

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The Health Benefits of a Simple Egg Sandwich

This is the typical conversation most mornings and sometimes on the weekends during snack time between my wife and my 4 year old daughter.

“Mommy, I’m hungry.” “What would you like to eat?” “Egg Sandwich”.

She wants a fried egg, cooked in a small drizzle of extra virgin olive oil over moderate heat with a sprinkling of ground pepper on a freshly baked wholemeal bread sandwich. I introduced her to eggs when she was a child. Eggs are easy to chew and should be part of the daily diet of any child a year and older. I remember when my daughter when she was little would eat the egg white first and then pop the whole yolk of a hard-boiled egg straight into her mouth. I still remember when I was a child and my mother would give me a boiled egg whenever I was hungry. What happened to the old days when eggs were given as snacks?

Today we live in a society prone to addiction. Of all the addictions out there, one of the most deadly is the most overlooked: junk food. We feed our children junk food every day without realizing it. We are all guilty of doing this. It’s easier to pull out a bag of chips when a child is hungry rather than when they are hungry. This practice is acceptable for rare occasions, but the problem with our society is that we use this type of junk food as a common snack every day.

Did you also know that processed foods are junk food? The first image that most people think of when they hear the term “processed food” is a wrapped hamburger and a sleeve of fries served at a counter in a fast food joint. But the truth is that the food you have in your cupboards is processed if it’s boxed, bagged, canned or jarred, frozen or dehydrated and has a list of ingredients on the label. Processed foods have been altered from their natural state for reasons of “safety” and convenience. Processed foods are more convenient, it’s much easier to make a cake by opening a box, throwing in a dry mix and adding an egg and a little oil than starting from scratch. Instead of making a dish with fresh ingredients, why not pick up a prepared meal at the store? Isn’t it easier to pop it in the microwave for a couple of minutes? No pots and pans, no mess! But processed foods have colors, often inedible, carcinogenic and harmful to the body. Studies have found that food dyes can cause hyperactivity and lack of concentration in children. Chocolates, colas, flavored drinks and snacks are full of artificial colors. These are not the only additives in processed foods. Don’t forget refined salt, sugar, preservatives, flavor enhancers, and other so-called “beneficial supplements.” Children are especially vulnerable to these unnatural ingredients. Poor diets can stunt growth, decay new teeth, promote obesity, and sow the seeds of debilitating disease and illness that ultimately lead to incurable disease and death, or worse, make life unbearable.

Did you know that approximately 80% of mothers, who are often the primary parent controlling their child’s diet, rated their child’s diet as “very good/good/healthy” and thus overestimate the quality of their child’s diet. This is extremely concerning, as mothers who do not perceive that their children are eating an unhealthy diet will not make the appropriate changes to improve their child’s eating habits. Don’t be one of these mothers, feed our children properly and this can only be done by reducing the introduction of processed junk food into their diets. If you think you are one of these moms who has done this before, think again. Do you feed your child bread from the bakery? Do you give them bottled “freshly squeezed” juice? Do you give them fruit yogurts? Do you spread your toast or sandwiches with commercial butter or margarine? Do you use canned tomatoes to make your sauces? Do you feed them sweet corn or frozen peas? Worst of all, do you give them apples you haven’t washed? This line of questions could go on, but if you’ve already answered “yes” to most of these questions, your child has an unhealthy diet! (If you want to know more about the foods described above and why they are considered unhealthy, read our research on “Is your food Killing You?”).

How can a simple egg sandwich contribute to a healthy diet? A fried egg sandwich, for example, consists only of bread, egg and possibly butter and the oil used to cook the egg. The benefits of homemade bread are described in our article “Whole grains and their benefits”. The benefits of homemade butter are described on our blog. The egg is a nutrient-dense food, containing high-quality protein and a wide range of essential vitamins, minerals and trace elements.

As a whole food, eggs are an inexpensive, low-calorie source of nutrients such as folate, riboflavin, selenium, lecithin, and vitamins B-12 and A. Eggs are also one of the few exogenous sources of vitamins K and D. In addition, whole . eggs are a complete source of protein as they contain all the essential amino acids needed by the human body. Although eggs were found to have lower amino acid content compared to beef, the biological value of egg protein is higher. Egg protein source is good for skeletal muscle development and egg protein is widely used by athletes to increase muscle mass.

We all know the health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids, especially eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality from heart disease. Low levels of DHA have been associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Chicken feed is now fortified with omega-3 to increase the levels of omega-3 in their eggs. Consumption of DHA-enriched eggs can greatly improve current dietary intake of DHA from non-fish sources and help approach or exceed recommended intakes for optimal human health.

Eggs have fallen in and out of favor over the years, primarily due to the perception of cholesterol-rich eggs as a “forbidden food” developed in response to the American Heart Association’s (AHA) 1970s recommendation to restrict egg consumption and limit dietary intake of cholesterol up to 300 mg/d. Dietary cholesterol guidelines are similar in the most recent AHA report; however, their position regarding egg intake has become more specific. It has been stated that the intake of one yolk per day is acceptable, if other foods that contribute to cholesterol are limited in the diet. Although one egg contains 212 milligrams of cholesterol, dietary cholesterol has less effect on blood cholesterol than previously believed. In addition, cholesterol is a dietary component that has attracted much public and scientific interest in relation to CHD, but extensive research has failed to establish a definitive link between dietary cholesterol intake and disease progression. In fact, a recent review of years of research concluded that healthy adults can enjoy eggs without CVD. Many conclusions can be drawn about the harmful effects of eating eggs, but they must be taken with caution. For example, one study concluded that eggs were related to a higher risk of type 2 diabetes, but this was not the real story as the result of the manifestation of this disease was the associated poor nutrition, mainly sausages and bacon taken with eggs in the individuals tested . The reality of the situation is that although egg intake has steadily declined since the original recommendations in the 1970s, CHD and type 2 diabetes, as well as obesity, remain the leading causes of death in the United States today.

Eggs are getting some attention for their role in maintaining eye health and potentially helping prevent age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the United States. This condition develops from long-term oxidative damage caused by exposure of the eye to intense light. Recent research has demonstrated the value of lutein, a natural pigment or carotenoid in egg yolks. Lutein and zeaxanthin accumulate in the macular region of the retina, therefore, due to their chemical properties; these two carotenoids may work to reduce the risk of developing AMD. Epidemiological studies support the fact that those individuals who consumed a greater number of foods rich in lutein and zeaxanthin had a lower risk of AMD. Although eggs contain less lutein than green leafy vegetables, the lutein in eggs is more easily absorbed. One yolk has been found to provide 200 to 300 micrograms of these carotenoids. In a study that measured the total carotenoid content of various foods, lutein accounted for 15-47/100 parts of the total carotenoids found in various dark green leafy vegetables, while eggs contained 54/100 parts. This suggests that one would benefit more from eating an egg than from obtaining lutein from other sources. Lutein and zeaxanthin are also classified as antioxidants and their intake may also be associated with a decreased risk of rheumatoid arthritis, CHD and chronic diseases such as cancer.

Eggs contain many of the minerals that the human body needs for health. In particular, eggs are rich in choline, an essential nutrient required for the normal functioning of all cells. It is especially important for the proper liver, brain and neural network, memory development and even inflammation, thus reducing the risk of heart disease and breast cancer. The potential public health implications of not consuming enough of this essential nutrient have only recently begun to be examined. There is significant variation in the dietary requirement for choline. When fed a choline-deficient diet, some men and women developed fatty liver and liver and muscle damage, while others did not. This brings genetic variability to dietary choline requirement. However, it is highly recommended not only for children, but also for expectant mothers, as eggs are a concentrated source of choline with no added calories. To get the same amount of choline found in a single egg (125 mg/72 calories; most of the choline is in the egg yolk – 680 mg/100 g), you need to consume 3 ¼ cups of milk (270 calories) or 3 ½ ounces of wheat germ (366 calories).

Despite all their positive characteristics, eggs are sometimes linked to food safety issues. They must be stored and handled correctly. Eating raw eggs is not considered safe because eggs can contain salmonella, a type of bacteria that is especially dangerous for the very young, old and immunocompromised. In cases where raw egg is called for in a recipe, make sure it is pasteurized.

If judged as a complete food, and not simply as a source of dietary cholesterol, the positive contribution of eggs to a healthy diet becomes apparent and far outweighs the myths about dietary cholesterol in eggs. Since eggs are a conventional food that contains nutrients that play a key role beyond basic nutrition, their promotion as a functional food should be considered. In conclusion, it is time to change the message of the egg. For the consumer, the most essential image is probably that eggs taste good. Taste is very important to consumers. The second image that needs to change is for eggs to be recognized as a nutritious food that also has health benefits beyond basic nutrition. The concept of eggs as a “functional food” is new to many and requires a change in perception of the role of eggs in the body. diet And finally, the evidence that egg consumption is unrelated to heart disease risk must be widely disseminated among health professionals and the public so that everyone can benefit from including eggs in the diet.

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